EcDev: What’s new behind the scenes!

This involves Ice Cream.

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Area Wide Plan Timeline

The Economic Development Committee kicked it old-school on June 1st, marking up the whiteboard in the municipal building conference room.  The subject:  creating a plan for two commercial/industrial “brownfield” properties

A brownfield is an industrial or commercial site “where future use is affected by real or perceived environmental contamination.”   Property owners have to think about these things before they buy, sell or develop land which may — or may not — be contaminated.

At stake is the difference between a property being developed — or not.  Let’s say you want to build office space on a location where, once upon a time, someone buried an oil tank or dumped antifreeze all over the place.  If you want to build, you might have to go through quite a few expensive hurdles.  And if you wanted to sell the property, it may look less attractive for development to a potential buyer.  They would have to go through the same expensive hurdles as you.  The end result:  development is delayed or doesn’t happen at all.

So how can an Economic Development Committee help a developer when a question of potential environmental issues arise?

With an EPA-funded grant of $43,000. 

EPA BF AWP fact sheet.png

If we want to stimulate our local economy by attracting new businesses, we need to help property owners jump through regulatory hurdles in a positive, helpful way.  Creating a plan to help assess and, if necessary, clean up the site is much more helpful than it sounds.  If you’re not a developer, all this stuff may sound boring.  If you are a developer, all this stuff sounds expensive.  This is why the EPA provides Brownfields Area Wide Planning grants to communities.  It’s essentially a revitalization instrument that catalyzes the reuse of property which might otherwise not be cleaned up or developed.

Are you still with me?  Because there’s ice cream coming up!

Here’s the official explanation from the EPA’s brownfield grant funding page:

Brownfields area-wide planning (BF AWP) is a grant program which provides funding to conduct activities that will enable the recipient to develop an area-wide plan (including plan implementation strategies) for assessing, cleaning up and reusing catalyst/high priority brownfield sites. Funding is directed to a specific project area, such as a neighborhood, downtown district, local commercial corridor, old industrial corridor, community waterfront or city block, affected by a single large or multiple brownfield sites.

So what properties in Northfield are we talking about?  On June 1st, the Economic Development Committee  selected two site locations to receive planning support.  Six potential sites were identified a few months ago.

  • Former Bean Chevrolet
  • Former Nantanna Mill
  • Former Comfort Colors Property
  • 108 N. Main Street (next to Dollar General)
  • Mayo-NSB-East Street Block
  • Freightyard properties (former Northfield Wood Products area)

Site selection was based on a list of weighted criteria with a baseline of environmental uncertainty.  The results were pretty straightforward.

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Nate’s Brownfield Selection Notes
  • What is the size of property?
  • Does the potential use of the property align with the Town Plan and V-DAT report?
  • Does the landowner want to participate, and is the landowner interested in developing the property?
  • Will a development on the property encourage additional improvements in the community?
  • What is the potential level of environmental assessment and cleanup?

After assessing these criteria, the Freightyard lot and Mayo-NSB-East Street Block were chosen.  (The outlined areas in the map below are approximate.)
AWP Sites

The next step is “community engagement.”  This is where the ice cream comes in!

On July 19th the Northfield Community Development Network, in partnership with the Planning Commission and Economic Development Committee, will host a fun event including bountiful mounds of ice cream (and perhaps healthier alternatives).

Some good folks from Stone Environmental will be there seeking your input for the Area Wide Plan.  They’ve already starting mapping things out.  Literally.  Here’s a link to a really cool “story map” they put together:

https://cvrpc.maps.arcgis.com/apps/MapJournal/index.html?appid=9828ff061a0b4f399c8fc009b6493063

Go ahead, click the link and scroll down.  You’ll see a bit of history along the way.

You’ll also notice that the story isn’t quite done.  This is because you’re part of the story.  Your thoughts and ideas are relevant to the planning process.  Stone Environmental has been hired to talk with you, listen to your ideas and gather input as they create our Area Wide Plan.  And it’s all happening this summer.  The plan will be complete by September 31st.  When it’s done, then perhaps we’ll see some new developments in town — on the Freightyard and along the Mayo-East Street Block.

So please put July 19th in your calendar.  And remember:  Ice Cream.

Northfield Area Wide Plan

2 thoughts on “EcDev: What’s new behind the scenes!”

  1. Nate. What’s the deal with the Northfield forest and the committee that is not letting people use it for any non- motorized recreation. We should be promoting those trails.

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    1. Well, I’ve read about it on FPF, but I can’t claim to know the details quite yet. But since you and others have asked, I sent an email to the NCC and Selectboard Chairs suggesting it might be a good idea to conduct public outreach so Town Forest users can be heard. It’s what we do when important issues come up at the Economic Development Committee. It’s also what we do with the new, private non-profit, the Northfield Community Development Network (NCDN). Outreach makes sense, especially when it’s pretty clear residents have questions and concerns.

      I really think it would be unfortunate if there was no public outreach and the issue gets ugly. When I first wrote about the Town Forest at the top of Turkey Hill on the Berlin border, my purpose was to provide transparency on a deal few people knew about. I’m glad people are taking an interest in the NCC’s work.

      Outreach, for the record, means approaching people outside of public meetings. People don’t show up at public meetings. This is is why there will be ice cream in July hosted by the NCDN, the EcDev Committee, and the Planning Commission. : )

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